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FLTLC

Proper Way To String Dimensions....

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FLTLC

Hi everyone,

I'm currently having a debate within my drafting dept. as to which string of dims is more correct.....any input would be great..

 

The 1st pic with the dim that is pulled off the line, is viewed as sloppy and lazy.

 

Your thoughts?

 

Thanks!

 

0f1a6361-dba0-45e6-942e-ab38329957f9_zps2fa1f6a0.jpg

 

ed9c8db2-b20d-42f0-9d2d-7047a9498ba4_zps28295c2d.jpg

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Murph_map

The "proper" way is the way the guy/gal that signs the paycheck wants it and/or the client wants it.

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Barneel

^^^^^^^^^^

This

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Barneel

Either ask for a set of company drawing standards, or do it one way and if they complain update it in the next revision

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RobDraw

I think sloppy and lazy are harsh terms to describe something as minor as that. That placement is wrong but I would find that terminology a bit extreme. Think about it. You've got a string of 100 dimensions and one of them is pulled out an inch from the others. Wouldn't you want to align with the other 99?

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Dana W

The second image is the most common, and the most correct method. Every drafting class I have ever taken has taught it this way. The way the boss wants things done, whether correct or not, as long as it is legal, is the correct way.

 

When one is laying out dimensions in several rows, along the same side of an object, having a bunch of them off line makes it hard to read. Don't argue that your example is only one line. Does one wear a shirt with one button undone in the middle of a run of buttons?

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ReMark

No one in the company you work for has a good old book about architectural drafting? This question was answered back when your great grandfather was alive.

 

Here, I'll recommend one, no, make that two.

 

1. Architectural Design and Drafting by Alan Jefferis and David A. Madsen

 

2. Architectural Graphic Standards by Ramsey and Sleeper

 

The second book is practically considered a "bible" for architectural drafting and design. You may now bow your heads.

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f700es

I agree with Dana in the 2nd option. I always show some type of leader when the dim text is pulled out of the string.

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Dana W
I agree with Dana in the 2nd option. I always show some type of leader when the dim text is pulled out of the string.
The main point is to never pull the dimension line out of the contiguous string. In Architectural drafting, there is a tiny bit of room for self expression, ;) so it is acceptable, when the text won't fit between the extension lines, to either place the dimension text beside its extension lines if there is room, or if it is the end of a line of dimensions, and acceptable to place the text below or above the dimension line, with a leader.

 

When I have to place dimension text above or below the dimension line, I usually try to get the leader (straight) to parallel the angle of the arch ticks, and bisect the space between them. Also, I match these dimension text items to the horizontal (or vertical) alignment of other dimension text items I have had to move in a similar manner, which are in the same string.

 

If working in my shop, a draftsman would have to care about the appearance of the drawings as well as the accuracy. Drafting is part craft and part art. Aligning dimension text is not all about appearance. It is about ease of reading, and locating information by eye, quickly. If a drawing is all jumbled up, it is very difficult to read.

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Tuns
The "proper" way is the way the guy/gal that signs the paycheck wants it and/or the client wants it.

That is entirely wrong as there are such things as "industry standards" that by far trump company standards. The second option is clearly the correct way here. Separating it will only confuse someone else when they have to read it.

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ReMark

I am sure that from time to time we have all heard, from boss or client, "I want it done this way" for whatever reason. We can 'grin and bear it', argue the point or find a less demanding profession (bean counter). You pick and choose your battles. Not that I am saying we should completely discard the standards most of us have been taught to follow. Most of the time I will argue the point but first I'll gather my supporting evidence before stepping into the lion's den. Know what I mean?

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Organic

I don't like how either of the pictures are done. The "1/8" should be below the dimension lines.

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ReMark

Sounds like it's "poll" time! LoL

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maratovich
1.jpg

2.jpg

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Dana W
I don't like how either of the pictures are done. The "1/8" should be below the dimension lines.
The placement of the text is not as important as simply keeping the dimension line in alignment. The text goes where it fits, and in this example, you are correct in that it should be where it is less crowded up, below the dimension lines.

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tzframpton
The "proper" way is the way the guy/gal that signs the paycheck wants it and/or the client wants it.
Murph nailed it. Unless a client has a set of standards that are spec'd that go along with the job, it's you're own choice. You have internal standards, and client standards; anything that is internal standards is your own ballgame and rules. Do it how you please.

 

Fwiw, the 2nd image is how my company does it and is more preferred in my opinion.

 

That is entirely wrong as there are such things as "industry standards" that by far trump company standards. The second option is clearly the correct way here. Separating it will only confuse someone else when they have to read it.
"Industry standards" has a slight misconception with a lot of people in the design and drafting industry. Do they exist? Most certainly, yes. Is it imperative that you follow them? Absolutely not. The "official" documents are a go-by at best, and the term "industry standard" is a definition of common habits or practices IMHO. Company's are still free to do things their own way.

 

Sit in on one of our monthly CAD and Revit Standards Committee's and this argument gets debated every time. Haha, it's really funny when some of our guys think there's some state or federal law governing how you present drawing information.

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nestly

Imo...

dims.jpg

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ReMark

Standards are like anuses; every company has a bunch.:shock:

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