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nicolas

Non-Orthogonal WC and Bathroom

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nicolas

Hi to all.

 

Have a non-orthogonal WC/Bathroom and I have to fix Shower, WC, Washing Machine and Wash Hand Basin into it. Any help will be most welcomed especially from someone who has actually done this.

 

Non-Ortho WC-Bathroom.pdf

 

Thanks.

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ReMark

What you have shown so far seems reasonable however...

 

Is the washbasin going to be located against the exterior wall in a long vanity cabinet?

 

Why do you need three windows in a bathroom?

 

Why is the wall for the bathroom that forms one side of the passage thinner than the other walls?

 

BTW...is that a walk-in shower?

 

One of the problems I see is that you have a fixture that requires a water supply and a drain/sewer connection on each of the four walls.

 

Any chance you can move one of the windows to the end of the passageway? At least you would have some natural light in an otherwise dark hallway.

 

Can the door to the bathroom be relocated?

 

Well here are my suggestions for what it's worth.

 

Move one window to the end of the passage way. Relocate the door to the bathroom on the short wall to the left that meets up with the exterior wall. Keeping the washing machine on the same wall as you have it now install a corner shower (one with a 45 degree face on it) in the corner formed by the walls for the passage and the kitchen. Put a small vanity cabinet with sink and the WC on the wall that backs up to the kitchen. Now three of the four fixtures are in a straight line and will be easier to pipe up. And if you eliminate one window and relocate the other two then that small triangular space at the top of the room can be utilized for a storage area. I'd also change the thickness of the wall that the door to the bathroom is located in to match the others.

 

After a closer look relocating the door may not be possible since the wall length looks to be shorter than the width of the door. Any chance an adjustment of some kind could be made to accommodate the door?

Edited by ReMark

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SLW210

What program will you be using to accomplish this task?

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ReMark

Here is a rough idea of what I had in mind. I made the passage wall thicker, moved the door, eliminated one window and rearranged the fixtures.

 

Bathrm_Idea.JPG

 

If the washing machine comes with a stackable dryer you can easily vent through the exterior wall.

Edited by ReMark

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nicolas

Remark,

 

Thank you very much. I believe your proposal is a much better and more optimal one. I have canceled one of the window and have a riser instead to cater for the various pipes. Attached is the revised layout with a quick 3D for the overall project (not yet revised).

 

MARION 01c [20170712].pdf

3D-View 01h [20170711].jpg

 

Again many thanks for your inputs.

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ReMark

Why didn't you increase the width of the passage wall?

 

Wouldn't the wall between the bathroom and the kitchen be wider to accommodate the necessary piping for the bathroom fixtures? I don't fully understand what you did. In the U.S. the interior walls would normally be framed out using 2x4's except for the bathroom where the plumbing would require a 2x6 wall.

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nicolas

The wall are made up of concrete cellular blocks (inner and outer walls). All the walls are made up of 200mm due to large span and provision for additional 2-3 floors in the future. The walls for the wc/bathroom is a partition walls, again, concrete cellular wall of 100mm and does not carry any loads. The whole construction lays on a Reinforced Concrete Frame made up of pad footings, Columns, Beams and Slab. The outer walls are load-bearing walls and helpers to the RC Columns, as they are laid prior to casting of slab.

 

Attached is the latest layout (2D).

MARION 01d [20170712].pdf

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nukecad

Something you may not have considered.

 

Here in the UK it is very unusual to have a washing machine in a bathroom.

If no utility room is available then it is more often located in the kitchen, under a work surface on an external wall.

 

There are historical reasons for this - washing clothes uses hot water, in the days before mains water and electricity hot water was only readily available in the kitchen.

 

But the main reason these days is that electrical outlet sockets are not normally fitted in bathrooms for safety reasons.

 

Usually the only outlet socket you will find in a UK bathroom is an electric razor socket, at a relativly high level above the floor.

Everything else electrical in a bathroom, lights, showers, body driers, etc., is hard wired with water resistant fittings.

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nicolas

Nukecad,

 

Very good input regarding electrical security. I have not thought of this.

 

Thanks you very much for this.

MARION 01b [20170622]-GF.jpg

MARION 01b [20170622]-ELV.jpg

MARION 01b [20170622]-ELV 2.jpg

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ReMark

I've actually seen houses, here in the U.S., where the washing machine and dryer are located in a bathroom. They may be hidden in a closet area behind folding doors. Given the shower and sink will require hot water having the washing machine in the bathroom poses no additional problems.

 

We rented a house on the island of St. John's that had a stackable, front loading, washer and dryer in a closet in the bedroom. The back wall was shared with the master math.

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Glen1980

My Uncles old holiday home in Spain, both bathrooms had 220v sockets by the sink so you could plug in razors, electric heaters etc. Latest UK EEEC regs now say you can put sockets in bathrooms but recommends 3m distance (9-10ft) from any sanitaryware. Given the average British bathroom is 170x180cm this isn't all that useful! Also when my other Aunt and Uncle remodelled their house a couple of years back they did a combined utility/downstairs lavvy. Very strange to be using the facilities next to clean washing, although it does focus your aim!

 

On the attached designs I would say the pan of the WC looks too close to the wall and restricts frontal space, we wouldn't get away with that for a mobility compliant toilet in the UK and I wouldn't be overly happy as a customer if it's the only WC in the house.

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ReMark

The positions of the WC and the sink could be swapped.

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nicolas

I believe that given it is a new house, it is best to propose the safest installation to the client. Having the minimum electric socket in the bathroom will indeed be beneficial to the client. I believe I can switch the position of the wash hand basin with the toilet such that one using the toilet can have more space for his/her feet through I believe the blocks will differ much from the built environment. The wall between the kitchen and the Bath makes 3000mm (excluding the vertical duct). The bath will make 900mm, the toilet about 900 max. and a table for the sink, say 1200x600 will make more space available.

Non-Orthogonal Bathroom.jpg

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Dana W
Something you may not have considered.

 

Here in the UK it is very unusual to have a washing machine in a bathroom.

If no utility room is available then it is more often located in the kitchen, under a work surface on an external wall.

 

There are historical reasons for this - washing clothes uses hot water, in the days before mains water and electricity hot water was only readily available in the kitchen.

 

But the main reason these days is that electrical outlet sockets are not normally fitted in bathrooms for safety reasons.

 

Usually the only outlet socket you will find in a UK bathroom is an electric razor socket, at a relativly high level above the floor.

Everything else electrical in a bathroom, lights, showers, body driers, etc., is hard wired with water resistant fittings.

And in the USA, ground fault circuit breakers built into the outlets nearest to the sink or tub. Another thing, in a colder climate, avoid plumbing in an exterior wall when you cannot install R-30 or better insulation between the pipes and the exterior surface. This includes vent stacks.

 

Wait, is that a door just there past the lav? How does it work?

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Dadgad

You might want to consider rotating the toilet by 180 degrees and moving it, in line, across the bathroom, and sliding the sink to the right, towards the shower. The bathroom would feel much more spacious, and by moving the sink along the wall you could increase the storage capacity in the triangular vertex. Always nice to have a little more storage space, and important that in order to utilize it efficiently, that it be easily accessible. In this way the Throne Room starts to live up to its name.

 

As per Dana's post, those GFI (Ground Fault Interruptor) circuit breakers are very important. :beer:

Edited by Dadgad

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danellis

The gap between the sink cabinet and the opposite wall looks very small - certainly too small to walk past to get to the door in the corner.

 

I suspect that if you changed your sink type to eliminate the cabinet it would work, though...

 

 

dJE

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ReMark

"The gap between the sink cabinet and the opposite wall looks very small - certainly too small to walk past to get to the door in the corner." I suspect that "door" as you refer to it is actually an access panel for the pipe chase.

 

"You might want to consider rotating the toilet by 180 degrees and moving it, in line, across the bathroom, and sliding the sink to the right, towards the shower." The way it is laid out now would make it much easier to pipe up.

 

"Another thing, in a colder climate, avoid plumbing in an exterior wall..." Note that the OP is located in Mauritius which is situated in the Indian ocean with a mean temperature in the "colder" months of June thru September of 20.4 °C (68.7 °F). I don't think freezing will be a problem.

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Dadgad
The way it is laid out now would make it much easier to pipe up.

I concur, didn't meant to imply that it wouldn't, but it would be a much more pleasant space to use. Form follows function, not ease of installation. :beer:

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ReMark

Sure, but now you have created a need for two pipe chases which adds to the cost. The vanity could always be reconfigured so as to eliminate the wasted space formed by the triangle thus opening up a little more room for the WC.

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David Bethel

You can search Google images for corner toilets. There are some pretty cool designs.

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