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Jim Clayton

Autocad 3D

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Jim Clayton

I need some suggestions.  I work with AutoCAD 2d daily.  I'm extremely proficient at it.  I've had minimal exposure to 3d via PDMS and the class was such a nightmare that I mentally blocked it all out.  I'm at a point where I want to teach myself 3d to expand my job opportunities.  I'd like to do it as QUICKLY and EFFICIENTLY as possible.  I need some suggestions on how to achieve this.  Thoughts?  Currently I have access to AutoCAD 2014, that's it.  Thanks for the help.

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Cad64

What industry do you work in? I realize you only have Autocad, but there are far better programs for 3D.  I would recommend learning a program that is designed for the industry you work in, especially if you're doing this in order to expand your job opportunities. Most companies would want you to know Revit or Inventor or Solidworks or a program like that, depending on the type of work you do.

 

But, if Autocad is all you've got, I would suggest taking a look at some of the online training sites like Lynda.com or Pluralsight.com. They have a lot of video training available for a very reasonable price.

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ReMark

I would recommend picking up an aftermarket AutoCAD 3D book.  Another option would be to take a class.  It could be a 3 or 4 day class taught at an Authorized AutoCAD reseller or an 8 to 12 week course taught at a local community college.

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f700es

Agreed on the community college classes.

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SLW210

If you are looking to expand your career opportunities, I would also suggest a switch to a 3D software more applicable to the field you are working in over learning 3D AutoCAD.

If it is 3D AutoCAD you wish to learn, plenty of online tutorials to get you started, plenty of books available and lots of help here when you have a question, also.

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Jim Clayton
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Thanks everyone for the suggestions.  Currently in the Mechanical/Electrical industry  with a touch of Piping thrown in for fun...it's all EPC products.  I'll probably try to continue in this industry.  I've just noticed that my searches are limited with ONLY 2d under my belt.  I think I might have more luck teaching myself than Community College.  The only way I got through College the first round was with YouTube videos.  I'm just trying to fast track it.  A friend suggested picking one thing like a table and trying to teach myself to draw it in 3d.  I just didn't know if anyone else might have any other suggestions or good sources for learning material.  These all seem like good suggestions though.

 

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ReMark

So what exactly is your plan for teaching yourself if you don't mind sharing?

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tzframpton
On 1/7/2019 at 9:39 AM, Jim Clayton said:

Thanks everyone for the suggestions.  Currently in the Mechanical/Electrical industry  with a touch of Piping thrown in for fun...it's all EPC products.  I'll probably try to continue in this industry.  I've just noticed that my searches are limited with ONLY 2d under my belt.  I think I might have more luck teaching myself than Community College.  The only way I got through College the first round was with YouTube videos.  I'm just trying to fast track it.  A friend suggested picking one thing like a table and trying to teach myself to draw it in 3d.  I just didn't know if anyone else might have any other suggestions or good sources for learning material.  These all seem like good suggestions though.

Here are a list of 3D programs that are specific to your industry:

  • AutoCAD MEP
  • Fabrication CADmep
  • Revit MEP

You would use one of these three programs for authoring mechanical or electrical related designs. You would also most likely use a program called Navisworks or Revizto for navigation and coordination along with the programs above. I have experience in all three programs listed above and have been in the mechanical duct and piping industry for nearly 20 years. 

 

-TZ

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Jim Clayton

Well, this feels like a loaded question...but what the hell.  There is no real plan.  I went to school for design.  The teachers I had weren't great and/or I didn't do a great job picking up what they were teaching me.  So I relied on the internet.  Videos.  That's how I passed my classes.  Landed a job.  Extremely proficient and drafting like a madman these days.  Thought would try to find a syllabus of sorts or some good training resources, and become proficient in the basic functions and shortcuts.  Bingo Bango 3d Jango.

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Jim Clayton

Sorry was typing while you posted that.  Thanks for the reply and I greatly appreciate the help.

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tzframpton
37 minutes ago, Jim Clayton said:

Sorry was typing while you posted that.  Thanks for the reply and I greatly appreciate the help.

No prob. Not sure where you work or what your software resources are, but in the past I was able to talk to my superiors about upgrading software licenses at no extra costs, then began using these other programs. This helped me continue to provide my drawings per my job requirement, but let me "ease into" these other programs. Forums greatly helped me during these years, which was about 2006-2008 year range. 

 

The way my old boss' saw it, they didn't care what program I used, just so as long as the drawing outputs were what they needed to be. I began on Autodesk Building Systems (now AutoCAD MEP) and grew into Revit eventually. If you're in a similar situation, maybe you can use this as a game plan to "work and learn" simultaneously as I did. 

 

-TZ

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Jim Clayton

My whole department has been pushing that topic for a while now but management, and especially upper management is EXTREMELY...frugal...and unwilling to loosen the purse strings.  On this and many other topics.  One of the reasons for wanting to expand my knowledge base.  The forum has been a wealth of knowledge on things thus far though.

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ReMark

Then AutoCAD it is.  Take an object you already own measure it up and start constructing it in 3D.  No time like the present.  Start with something simple then move up to more complex objects.  Post images of your finished drawings as you progress.  If you have any questions then ask.

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Jim Clayton

Greatly appreciate the help.  This outta be interesting.  Last time I messed with 3d on PDMS anytime I drew something I kept placing objects through other objects.  Hopefully things go  a little smoother this time.

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tzframpton
2 hours ago, Jim Clayton said:

My whole department has been pushing that topic for a while now but management, and especially upper management is EXTREMELY...frugal...and unwilling to loosen the purse strings.  On this and many other topics.  One of the reasons for wanting to expand my knowledge base.  The forum has been a wealth of knowledge on things thus far though.

You need to make them understand how fast and accurate this software is, and it's not "that" much more. The proficiency you gain will increase productivity and mitigate costly errors once you get cruising. 

 

With our mechanical designs and using Revit, our template file is so well set up that we can have models, sheet index/covers, overalls, partials, enlarged, elevations, equipment schedules all complete for a multi level building in hours, not days or weeks. Because it's all set up before hand, and with the ability to pre-set all our View Templates with sacrificial Links that have predefined Categories set up, when we get our backgrounds it's just "done" already. 

 

With new software comes new levels of productivity and proficiency so the associated costs are greatly offset in a positive way. Seeking a consultant may help as well that can show this in action. My company provides this service if the higher ups are interested. Just one option in case it helps. 

 

-TZ

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Jim Clayton

Now there's a thought...someone from the outside throwing some influence around...I might see if I can spin that idea.

 

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SLW210

Can you post some 2D .dwgs of some of the items you would be drawing in 3d for your work?

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Jim Clayton

Just seeing this. Look for them in the morning once I get back to my desk. Tks.

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Jim Clayton

Am I setting the bar too high trying to do something like this fresh out the gate with little experience?  It just seems like it has a good mix of straight lines and contours to get some practice with.  (FYI 3/4 view in case that isn't clear)

 

Edited by Jim Clayton

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