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Raudel Solis

Raudel Solis Project 11

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Raudel Solis

Project as seen was done in less than 18 hours including rendering and post work. (note- i added too much blur on the second image)

 

Project 11 finalized v2 no A ch.jpg

 

Project 11 finalized v2 Final..jpg

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ReMark

Time to experiment with some different type of window designs don't you think?

 

What is this building supposed to be?

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Raudel Solis

this window design interest me i find the other types rather boring care to show me what you have in mind?

 

Simple guest house?

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ReMark

Simple guest house. OK. Where's the entrance door?

 

You have a floor plan for this guest house?

 

Other window types are boring? Compared to what?

 

Are your windows "fixed" pane? Can they be opened? Are you using an extruded aluminum frame?

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ReMark

I'd be interested in what windows like the ones you are using would add to solar gain.

 

You mean to tell me you have never taken a look at some of the different types/designs of windows as offered by Pella, Marvin or Anderson just to name three of the top manufacturers in the U.S.?

 

The following is an observation and not a criticism of you personally.

To me, the types of windows you have depicted look very much like the ones I see day-in and day-out on a lot of commercial developments (strip malls), industrial complexes, and where developers rehab an old industrial building. There's no real character to them.

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Raudel Solis

keep in mind im 16 years old.

Fixed pane windows. hammer needed to open them.

i could have simply done the older design back in the in past which they used 9*10 foot flexi glass for windows :lol:.

 

never heard of those manufacturers, also im not a structural engineer.

No floor plan available at the moment since it was created in 3ds max with no prior reference or idea. i just made it as i "imagined" it.

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ReMark

You can't fall back on the "I'm 16 years old" excuse after having passed yourself off as some sort of whiz kid. Sorry, I'm not cutting you any slack on that one.

 

So, you created a house with two full walls of fixed pane windows that can't be opened. I guess that is OK.

 

I believe you are referring to plexi-glass when you say "flexi glass"?

 

"Those manufacturers" make windows and doors. You don't have to be a structural engineer or even an architect to know that. I sense you haven't taken a moment and checked out any window manufacturers. You might benefit from doing so. Window designs these days are nowhere near as static as you might think nor as utilitarian as the ones you have choosen to use in all of your designs. Branch out a little. Personally, I don't see the windows you have used as being complimentary to the architecture of your guest house. Now if we were talking about the "Howard House" as designed by Brian McKay-Lyons or the "Yost House" as designed by architect Whitney Powers then I could understand the use of such a type of window.

 

If architecture is your passion then you might want to pick up the book Sustainable Homes by James Grayson Trulove and check out some of the 26 designs covered within.

 

Can we see a cross-section of one of your window frames? What would they be made out of?

 

BTW...what type of exterior treatment does the brown-colored walls represent?

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ReMark

Check these out when you get a chance.

 

http://www.andersenwindows.com/

 

http://www.marvin.com/

 

http://www.pella.com/home/default.aspx

 

If you are in to vinyl windows you can also check out Certainteed, Gilkey and Schuro.

 

Other books to consider for your architectural library are...

 

Rooftop Architecture - The Art of Going Through The Roof by Akiko Busch. It's about urban rooftop architecture. It is inventive and imaginative.

 

Architectural Graphic Standards by Ramsey & Sleeper. The "Bible".

 

Architectural Drafting and Design by Jefferis & Madsen.

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Cad64
You can't fall back on the "I'm 16 years old" excuse after having passed yourself off as some sort of whiz kid. Sorry, I'm not cutting you any slack on that one.

 

I agree with ReMark. If you're going to talk the talk then you've got to be able to walk the walk.

 

never heard of those manufacturers, also im not a structural engineer.

No floor plan available at the moment since it was created in 3ds max with no prior reference or idea. i just made it as i "imagined" it.

 

The number one most important thing you have to do when building 3D models is to gather reference material. Especially if you have no prior knowledge or experience in regards to what you're creating.

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SLW210

Research and learning the equipment and materials are the biggest portion of the workload. Operating the design/cad/modelling package is just the tool.

 

Imagining things will not put money in your pocket or food on the table. In two years, you will need to be in the workforce. You have a good knowledge of the tool, now start working on the research.

 

A good place to start is right here. Just listen the critiques and work from there.

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Raudel Solis

update. Changed window style.

the bricks are burgundy uniform.

window extrusion past the wall @ 1'8"

glass thickness for windows @ 0.3"

project 11 window finish.jpg

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Jack_O'neill
update. Changed window style.

the bricks are burgundy uniform.

window extrusion past the wall @ 1'8"

glass thickness for windows @ 0.3"

[ATTACH]28808[/ATTACH]

 

That certainly changed the look. I'll throw in a bit of advice too here, if I may. Don't want to make this sound like "pick on Raudel day" but if you want to do this stuff right, either go to your public library and check out a couple of books on home design and construction, or find some on Amazon or even you local Lowes or Home Depot. They will have DIY books that will give you the basics. You obviously have a flare for using the software, but a few hours of study would help you grasp the basics of structure and vastly improve your projects. If they can't build it, it don't matter how pretty it is.

 

Take for instance your bay window in the latest version. Looks nice, but you really need to slope the top of the window or put some sort of awning or roof or something there to handle rain and snow. You don't have to worry nearly as much about keeping water out of the structure if you don't provide horizontal surfaces for it to pool on. What's worse, lets say the installer actually makes a small mistake and the top slopes toward the building a little bit. Now you have a funnel running water into your living room!

 

The sun room or whatever you want to call the glassed in area looks great, but you'll need to check local codes about using commercial curtainwall in houses. I don't do much residential stuff aside from the occasional apartment/condo complex so I don't know if there an issue there or not. At any rate, curtainwall products handle water by providing places for it to run to, collecting it and channeling it back towards the outdoors. For that to be successful, you need concrete at the bottom for it to sit on in order to provide a water proof seal. It also flexes quite a bit with wind and building movement so you need good structure next to and above it. Some products anchor into the vertical members at each side, some only at the top and bottom. I've never seen it anchored at the bottom in anything external but concrete or steel, and I don't believe any wood structure there would be acceptable for strength or the water issue.

 

You're off to a good start, and now would be the time to grasp some good design techniques before you develop any bad habits that will be hard to break. On the other hand, if you are looking to do purely artistic stuff with no intention of ever seeing any of it built, that's fine too. A good artist can make a lot of money if the right person sees his art. There's no reason you couldn't do both if you wish, as long as you remember what I said earlier...it don't matter how pretty it is if you can't build it.

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Raudel Solis
it don't matter how pretty it is if you can't build it.

 

 

 

i made a thread a few months back about the role of an architect.

 

isnt that what architects do? design stuff that cant exist in the real world at the moment :shock:

 

iv'e checked out a few books a while back and all i saw in them designs by people with no prior structural back ground.

i have a work book "architectural drafting and design" 4th edition, it seem rather useless to me without the 3rd, 2nd and 1st edition :lol:

but it does come with quite a lot of blue prints.

 

about the window. the dimensions i used will not cause water to drip on the top flat area of the window extrusion.

 

also you may find this funny.

 

Google windows and see the result:lol:

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Jack_O'neill

i made a thread a few months back about the role of an architect.

 

isnt that what architects do? design stuff that cant exist in the real world at the moment :shock:

 

 

Sometimes they do, yes. Most of the time they have to come down to earth or they don't stay in business long.

 

iv'e checked out a few books a while back and all i saw in them designs by people with no prior structural back ground.

 

 

And how did you determine this? I wasn't talking about architecture or design books, but actual "how-to" books about construction.

 

 

i have a work book "architectural drafting and design" 4th edition, it seem rather useless to me without the 3rd, 2nd and 1st edition :lol:

but it does come with quite a lot of blue prints.

 

You use a dictionary without every previous edition ever made don't you? All "4th edition" means is that it's the 4th time the book has been published (this is usually done to update the information contained in it).

 

about the window. the dimensions i used will not cause water to drip on the top flat area of the window extrusion.

 

Fine, how are you going to keep it from blowing on there? Hard to control the wind.

 

also you may find this funny.

 

Google windows and see the result:lol:

 

 

This was my result. I don't get it...what's funny?

google window.jpg

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Raudel Solis

And how did you determine this? I wasn't talking about architecture or design books, but actual "how-to" books about construction.---

architecture books as references, i know that the books i checked out on architecture are somewhat structurally impossible to achive because ive studied a lot of blue prints my dad brings home from commercial projects. small gas station structures to commercial centers and high schools to elementary schools. i know a few standards towards concrete structures. i noticed 1 image that had a concrete wall for privacy that measured about 30' in lenght 8-12' in height and a thickness of about 1'6-1'10. Thats expensive and unreasonable.

 

==============

the book i have on fourth edition is actually in a series. they dont update the one i have its in a series each edition covers different approaches and blah blah blah. over all every edition is different when it comes to stuff covered.

 

=========================

about the rain it could rain all year long. i would worry about the foundation more than the windows.

simple fix to the window's appearance would be to grap the top vertex at the middle of the flat area where the wall intersects and raise it 1 inch. the slope is sufficient at the given distance to the end of the window.

 

---------------------------

on

the windows google search press images

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Jack_O'neill

i noticed 1 image that had a concrete wall for privacy that measured about 30' in lenght 8-12' in height and a thickness of about 1'6-1'10. Thats expensive and unreasonable.

 

 

 

Depends on how much privacy the owner wants or needs. If its an embassy, that ain't enough.

 

the book i have on fourth edition is actually in a series. they dont update the one i have its in a series each edition covers different approaches and blah blah blah. over all every edition is different when it comes to stuff covered.

 

What you have is one volume of a series in its 4th edition. The word "edition" refers to the total number of copies printed at one run. A later reprint would be a 5th edition even if they didn't update the information. Terminology is everything. Effective communication depends on using the right words.

 

about the rain it could rain all year long. i would worry about the foundation more than the windows.

simple fix to the window's appearance would be to grap the top vertex at the middle of the flat area where the wall intersects and raise it 1 inch. the slope is sufficient at the given distance to the end of the window.

 

Yeah, until the homeowner comes home one day to 6 inches of water on the living room floor and sues your backside off in court for a crummy design. Water will pool on horizontal surfaces. When it does it will either find a way into the building, or it will sit there collecting dirt, leaves, mosquito larvae, and algae until it does find a way in. You can either allow for that in your design or pay for the damages it does later.

 

Look...you put stuff on here and ask for opinions. When you get anything besides a pat on the back, you whip out the "remember, I'm only 16" bit and argue with the people that are trying to help you. If you want to draw pretty pictures, then draw pretty pictures. Nothing wrong with that, just say that's what you're doing. If you want to design buildings then drop the attitude and learn to do it correctly.

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ReMark

The curtainwall as depicted in the latest image would require a framing member where it abuts the wall of the house at either end. The glass would not just stop right at the wall like it is shown as there would be no satisfactory way of sealing it. The glass, the framing members and the wall all have different rates of expansion/contraction.

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Jack_O'neill
The curtainwall as depicted in the latest image would require a framing member where it abuts the wall of the house at either end. The glass would not just stop right at the wall like it is shown as there would be no satisfactory way of sealing it. The glass, the framing members and the wall all have different rates of expansion/contraction.

 

Yes, and that corner would look something similar to this in cross section:

endwall.JPG

 

This particular curtainwall product does not attach to the sidewalls. It is supported top and bottom.

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ReMark

Nice detail there Jack. We using backer bar and caulk at the junction with the wall?

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Jack_O'neill
Nice detail there Jack. We using backer bar and caulk at the junction with the wall?

 

Thanks!

 

Yuppers...backer rod at all caulk joints. That avoids what my old employer calls "3 point adhesion" which they say is the leading cause of premature perimeter seal failure. Caulking will stretch and compress nearly forever if it's stuck on 2 sides, but if it adheres on 3 sides, it will cause a shearing action that will lead to leaks and causes building owners to call you bad names.

 

Raudel, note the 1" laminated glass in this detail. It's two pieces of 1/4" glass laminated to a 1/2" spacer. The gap between them is filled with an inert gas (varies between manufacturers) to drive out moisture and keep the panes from sweating internally. This provides a much better barrier between the elements and the interior of the structure and greatly reduces the heating and cooling bills as opposed to a single glass. This is what the literature refers to as insulated glass. You can get it tinted, mirrored, even coated with solar cells. By the same token, it is quite heavy, hence the need for beefed up structure. Curtain wall itself is not a structural component. You'll need a pretty hefty lintel or header over this. The weight of the roof and wall above will have to be transfered to the corners. Depending on the width of the span, the structure I show in the detail will have to be increased to accomodate it.

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