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MisterJingles

JOIN aint joining.

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MisterJingles

Hi all

 

Why would 2 line segments not join to one another with the JOIN command?

I OSNAP each end but I get this ...

 

"Command: _join 2 found

 

0 objects joined, 2 objects discarded from the operation

Command:

Command: *Cancel*"

 

In this instance its an arch and a line. It happens regularly.

 

Thanks

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SLW210

You need to use the _PEDIT command. Read up on _JOIN in help.

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CyberAngel

Could be that the objects are noncoplanar. Check their elevations.

 

I have a lot of trouble with joining arcs to lines, especially when it's a straight polyline segment joining to an arc object. Something about precision, I'd guess.

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rkent

The endpoints of each of those objects need to be in the same location for join to work. Use pedit or blend perhaps.

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MisterJingles

CyberAngel I dont work on different elevations, glad to hear Im not the only one who has this problem though :)

rkent - The end points are in the same location as Im snapping to the endpoint. In the morning I will explore the pedit function you and SLW suggest. Home time!

 

Thanks guys

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ryank7

I had this same issue and this is what worked out for me

 

pedit

m

select the objects

j

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JD Mather

Attach the file here that exhibits this behavior.

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Patrick Hughes

Another problem can be the object's extrusion vectors - they must match. (at least in the case of trying to join 2 arcs).

 

An arc can be constructed from an inverted UCS which will cause the extrusion vector mismatch.

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ReMark

Looks like one line has an elevation of "0" and the other has an elevation of 4.8060.

 

I suppose it doesn't help looking at it in plan view as the two ends appear to touch but if you switch to an SE isometric view you'll see the problem immediately.

 

Even better, after switching to an isometric view do a 3D orbit.

 

Credit CyberAngel with knowing the answer. Nice catch.

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JD Mather

I think the majority of questions asked here could be answered with only one response if the OPs would simply attach the data.

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MisterJingles

JD - I think I agree with you, will bear it in mind for future.

 

ReMark - Is there any way I could have given the elevation a value other than inputting it manually? I most certainly didn't input it myself.

Also, I work in LT, I therefore can't view it in any 3D view whatsoever right?

 

Thanks CyberAngel sorry to dismiss your suggestion :oops:, I just dont understand how I did this.

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ReMark
I think the majority of questions asked here could be answered with only one response if the OPs would simply attach the data.

That would be much too easy. We'd have to spend the rest of our time talking about politics and religion.:shock:

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ReMark

MJ: Did you check to see what the value for ELEVATION is current set at?

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MisterJingles

Yes I did, your figures were spot on. My question is how could the ELEVATION have been changed to 4.806 for the one end if I didn't consciously do that myself?

Its not like the value "4.806" is appropriate anywhere else on the drawing which may lead me to believe I had set my cursor focus in the wrong place. And besides, I had 3 or 4 instances of this on the same drawing. It just doesn't make sense to me. But then what do I know? :)

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ReMark

I have no idea. I just try to help with fixing problems. I'm puzzled how half of the problems that are posted here are caused in the first place. I can count on one hand the number of problems I've had over the past six releases I've installed. Some people experience three times that many in one release. Damned if I know how they manage to do it. One of the mysteries of CAD life I guess.

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MisterJingles

Sure, but bear in mind you have the know-how to solve your own problems. Users like myself are still getting there, next time I will solve this issue on my own.

Ill blame this one on the receptionist fiddling with my CAD whilst I was out. That's my story and I'm sticking to it.

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ReMark

I wasn't born with that know-how and I've made plenty of mistakes of my own on the way to gaining it. And I still make mistakes. I'm not perfect but I do keep trying.

 

You created this drawing from scratch? You did not inherit it from someone else who may have been using a full version of AutoCAD?

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JD Mather
That's my story and I'm sticking to it.

 

I assume LT has the LIST command (LI) it will become your friend in figuring stuff out like this (as well as Properties).

 

(F2 is another good one - IF you use it right after you discover unusual behavior.)

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nestly
My question is how could the ELEVATION have been changed to 4.806 for the one end if I didn't consciously do that myself?

 

It may be possible that when you moved, copied, or grip edited something, you accidentally used a comma instead of a period, resulting in an unintended elevation change. ie. keying in 2,5,5 when you intended to key in 2,5.5. I'm not saying that's what happened, but it's a possibility.

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