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drafterjohn773

-Penn Foster? HVAC transition piece

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drafterjohn773

Hello! Does Any One Know How To Draft A 10"x14"x6" RECTANGULAR Hvac Pattern

THATS 14"X6" ON ONE SIDE AND10"X6" ON THE OTHER

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Tankman

Welcome to the forums drafterjohn! Where might you be posting from?

 

10x14x6 pattern?

10" x 14" rectangle x 6" high?

10"Ø x 14"Ø x 6" high?

Need to know more.

 

I started working in sheetmetal, duct work, over 40 years ago.

A worthwhile and satisfying trade.

 

All kinds of worthwhile reference material available at The Sheetmetal Shop.

 

http://www.thesheetmetalshop.com/pn/index.php?module=htmlpages&func=display&pid=142

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drafterjohn773

Hello! Tankman Are You There, I Sure Use Your Help If You Can Help Me

I Am Riquired To Draw A 2d Hvac Pattern That Is 14" X6"rectangular On One End And 10"x6" Rectangular On The Other End . Any Help From You Will Be Greatly Appreciated

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drafterjohn773

Hay Sorry I Miss Your ? There Iam Posting From Reading, Pa.

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Tankman
Hay Sorry I Miss Your ? There I am posting From Reading, Pa.

 

Posting from Perkasie, PA 'bout 15 miles south of the triple duce, south of Allentown, PA.

 

Take a peek-a-boo at the attached *.dwg file.

Lots would depend on sheetmetal gauge and, how do you want to assemble the transition?

 

If small gauge sheetmetal, easy enough to add 1/2" flanges for spotwelding two pieces together to make the transition. :unsure:

Rect_Transition.dwg

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Tankman

John:

 

Added a bit to the sketch (drawing). Sitting here, just watched the Eagles choke again. Ouch.

 

I didn't note the bend angles, easy enough.

I did add 1/2" flanges for spot welding, again, don't know how you want to secure this transition. I also don't know the gauge you're working with. I am assuming light gauge HVAC ductwork.

 

The top bends will be over 90°, the bottom (10" x 14") bends will be under 90°.

 

Comments welcome.

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drafterjohn773

054042.pdftankman i think you very much for your help, light bulbs are starting to flick on now;however i would like to snd you a copy of the instructions that was given to concerning how to go about drawing this transition piece. please take a look at it and send feed back.

 

drafterjohn

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Tankman

John:

 

I'll take a peek at your *.pdf sometime today.

At first glance, very nice.

 

We must also take note, there's always another way to complete the project.

There's always more than one way to complete an AutoCAD layout too!

Rect_Transition_Flgs.dwg

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tzframpton

When you mean "pattern" are you meaning you need to create a flat pattern that will be fed to a plasma or cutter? Or do you just need to represent a transition dimensionally so that a fab shop can produce the transition for you?

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JD Mather
Is 14" X6"rectangular On One End And 10"x6" Rectangular On The Other End .

 

How far between ends?

Flat.gif

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Tankman
I think if I were a student I would want to be learning next-generation CAD tools.

http://www.autodesk.com/edcommunity

 

Excellent post Mr. Mather!

 

I'm from the very old school and have a tough time learning new "tricks." All my work in AutoCAD has been simple plan and elevation views; pipe, valves, pumps, chemical storage tanks. An add-on for AutoCAD draws all the pipe, fittings, valves, a great add-on!

All are ANSI and the program will generate a BOM for me if needed.

 

I believe John wanted a 10 x 14 base, a 6" x 6" top, elevation of 6".

Perhaps you could post John's configuration if you are so inclined.

 

If we had the technology 40+ years ago, life in the sheetmetal business certainly would have been easier.

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drafterjohn773
When you mean "pattern" are you meaning you need to create a flat pattern that will be fed to a plasma or cutter? Or do you just need to represent a transition dimensionally so that a fab shop can produce the transition for you?

Hello! may be this real better explain what i mean. thank for helping054042.pdf please see bottom of page 19

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JD Mather
Hello! may be this real better explain what i mean. thank for helping[ATTACH]15618[/ATTACH] please see bottom of page 19

 

I would hate to have to work off only those written instructions without any drawings or sketches. Didn't I see a reference to some figures (I didn't find any) or did I miss something?

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Tankman
I would hate to have to work off only those written instructions without any drawings or sketches. Didn't I see a reference to some figures (I didn't find any) or did I miss something?

 

I'm guessing John received dimensions verbally from his instructor.

Naturally a sketch would've been welcome.

 

On another note, my Grandfather was the plant manager for Stroehman Bakery in Williamsport for many years.

 

During the summer, for us youngsters, entertainment was Little League games. 8)

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JD Mather
During the summer, for us youngsters, entertainment was Little League games.

 

Small world.

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chloe2012

Hi,

I've started to work on Plate 3 of the HVAC project. I have no idea what to do next. I am unable to figure it out. Can someone please help and talk me through the next steps

Edited by chloe2012

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JD Mather

What textbook are you using to learn Developments?

 

I would start by drawing line A-B.

Then at B draw a circle R B-10' and at A draw a circle R A-10'

Where they intersect is point 10. Label this and draw true length lines A-10 and B10.

 

Attach the file here for next step.

Edited by JD Mather

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chloe2012

Hi,

 

I think I have done what you described. I drew line A-B and at each point A and B I drew a 10" radius circle with A and B as the center. Then drew line A-10 and B-10. However this line is shorter than what is on the front view. So now I am really confused. I have attached the file as you asked. As I mentioned before the only textbooks I was using is what was provided by Penn Foster. I have also attached the booklet that describes what I need to accomplish.

Edited by chloe2012

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JD Mather

Where did you get 10" radius?

 

You have a point #10.

You solved for true length of line from point A to point #10' (that is 10 prime - new designation for position of point. Not 10 feet. Not 10 inches)

 

That pdf is probably copyrighted. I suggest you remove it. It is one thing to post a relavent image from the pdf and quite another to attach the entire file.

 

The pdf refers to, "

Follow the instructions in the text to find the true lengths of

 

all the lines. Label the true lengths of the lines as you create

 

them."

 

But any text I have seen shows the true length projection labele like A-10' (10 prime)

 

The R A-10' and B-10' is actually 18.38477631 inches.

Edited by JD Mather

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