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Pablo Ferral

What makes a great Technical drawing?

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Pablo Ferral

This is a question that comes up frequently. I'm sure that you all have your own opinion - based on your industry and your companies needs.

 

 

I'm interested in hearing your views. Is accuracy important? Or is it a given that all drawings should be correct? Should drawings be done to a standard? Is it more important that your drawing are done on time, or within the budgeted hours? Does the CAD part of the job matter? If the information you need to communicate is on the page - that's good enough right?

 

I'm interested to hear what you have to say.

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ReMark

Accurarcy is paramount.

 

Standards are very important especially in a group environment. All drawings should look like they came from the same company.

 

Drawings should be done on time and within budget not withstanding special circumstances.

 

Of course the CAD part of the job matters. If no allowance is made for it then how does a company come up with an accurate estimate of job costs?

 

If the information I need to communicate is on the page it better be accurate and in the proper relationship to the rest of the drawing. It should also be clear and concise.

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tzframpton

"You can never put too much information on the drawings."

 

That always stood out for me. As long as it's accurate like Mark said, then organized well, you have yourself a pot of gold in a set of drawings. Things like this is simply learned with time and experience.

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BIGAL

Like Stykface organized well you must be able to read it not have stuff all over the place, clarity in order of importance.

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Dadgad

I tend to go with LESS IS MORE, meaning dead-on accuracy, but trying to minimize dimensional redundancy, in the interests of visual clarity.

I like to space dimensions as comfortably as possible, and really think about how everything fits on the page.

I like to include a bonus 3D perspective, sometimes two if an assembly warrants it, on a sheet, space permitting, to help give recipients a little eye candy overview.

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RobDraw

My first job was at an inground pool company and my boss said a couple of things that have stuck with me throughout the years. "The more white the better." which is another way of saying less is more. Don't try to crowd everything on one sheet. It makes it hard to read. The other is "Assume the person reading your drawing is an idiot." (It was his employees reading the plans.) Again, too much information could lead to confusion. But assuming that someone could figure something out is just as bad. The information must clear enough to build whatever is that needs to be built exactly as planned.

 

A well organized, simple drawing that is easy to read is much better than one that is crammed with information even if the information is relevant.

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ReMark

"Assume the person reading your drawing is an idiot.":lol: I love it.

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Tiger

I agree with all of the above, and will just add one thing: Know who you are doing the drawing for.

 

If it's for the building owner that could very well be a hairdresser for instance, then know what information is important for that person and don't clutter the drawing with information that might be accurate and important - but perhaps not for that individual.

 

If it's for the construction crew, learn what measurements he needs for construction, not what measurements you find easiest to place. Mr Tiger had a flaming row with a drafter over dimensioning a simple half-tapered hole . The drafter had set the angle of the taper and the diameters, Mr Tiger wanted the dimensions for the depth of the taper. The drafter couldn't see why Mr Tiger just couldn't calculate the dimension he needed on his own.

 

When I was new in this job I was out on site and met with the construction crew. After a bit he pulled out the drawing I had done, an A3 (I send them out in A1, double size of an A3) and measured with a foot-rule - i.e. a very un-precise but very handy measuring tool. I realised that for me to do the drawings with millimeter-precision was wasted in this particular business.

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Dadgad
The information must clear enough to build whatever is that needs to be built exactly as planned.

 

A well organized, simple drawing that is easy to read is much better than one that is crammed with information even if the information is relevant.

 

Very succinctly stated. :beer:

and it always helps to remember with whom you might inadvertently be dealing.

Our fabricators are very good, but those 3D perspective views are a nice additional bit of insurance,

especially on a complex piece.

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Pablo Ferral

Lots of great stuff here - thanks for participating :)

 

Tiger's comment:

'Know who you are doing the drawing for'

 

Is particularly insightful...

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ReMark

In his book entitled, Basic Technical Drawing, Cecil Spencer states the aims in technical drawing as...

 

First, a detail drawing must be accurate.

 

Second, a detail drawing must be executed with the proper technique, or good workmanship, which means that the lines must have "sparkle" or "snap" and exhibit good contrasts.

 

Third, a detail drawing should be neat...and orderly.

 

Fourth, a detail drawing must be made with speed, for "time is money," and the slow draftsman will soon find himself looking for another job.

 

He then writes, "Our drawings must stand alone in conveying the ideas of the engineer to the thousands of people who will use them." Finally, he goes on to say, "They must be so clear and complete that every one of the users arrives at exactly the same interpretation."

 

These words were first written in 1956.

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Tyke

All that has been said is totally correct. And to substantiate RobDraw's comment, we all know there are idiots all over the world, nobody has the monopoly.

 

It is not only "Know who you are doing the drawing for" that is very important, but also for what purpose it will be used. We have one client who distributes our drawings to different departments and we now deliver different versions of the same drawing but with different layer states. For this client we only deliver PDF files to the boss but the guys at the grass roots get DWGs as well.

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Tyke
These words were first written in 1956.

 

And every word quoted are as applicable today in a CAD environment as they were then with drawingboards. Good quote there ReMark.

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ReMark

I was thinking exactly the same thing Tyke. Thanks.

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SLW210

How did Technical Drawing turn into Detail Drawing?

 

What is ACCURACY?

 

A GREAT TECHNICAL DRAWING should convey the intended message to the intended audience.

 

I prescribe to "less is better" and you can put too much information on a drawing.

 

He then writes, "Our drawings must stand alone in conveying the ideas of the engineer to the thousands of people who will use them." Finally, he goes on to say, "They must be so clear and complete that every one of the users arrives at exactly the same interpretation."

 

:thumbsup:

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Tyke
How did Technical Drawing turn into Detail Drawing?

 

I think it was something to do with Darwin's evolution theory :lol:

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Dadgad

I'm a great fan of the Symmetrical About Centerline note, because it goes a long way towards cleaning up a drawing, and reducing redundancies. :beer:

symmetrical about centerline.JPG

Edited by Dadgad

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SLW210

Yes, I like using notes and (TYP.) is one of my favorites.

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ReMark

Hey, I just quoted the guy I didn't write it.

 

If you don't know the meaning of the word accurate you might want to think about a career that either involves throwing horseshoes or tossing hand grenades. LoL

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Dadgad

Yes I am also a great fan of (TYP.)

Why put the same part call out on 16 of something in one view, if they are conspicuously the same.

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