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D Mills

extrude comand

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ReMark

Maybe if you took some previous advice about changing the view you are using to work in it might work.

 

I wish you had answered some of my previous questions as we'd be pass this by now but for some reason you choose to ignore them. Help us to help you by answering our questions too. It works better that way.

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D Mills

How do you measure sloppy?

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D Mills

You must remember that this is not my trade I am a 30 year carpenter who has had to pick this up due to the lack of experience architects posses in real time construction methods.

 

I do not expect you guys to know exactly what I do for a living and would appreciate the same respect and patiants.

 

You use terms with meanings you only know please dumb it down.

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D Mills

Tell me how to change the view? Obviously the way it was explained I did not get it Sorry!

 

That gives you no right to disrespect me or be rude in speaking to me.

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ReMark

Kindly tell me how I have disrespected you. Quote from the relevant post(s).

 

And while you are at it tell me how I have been rude to you. Quote from the relevant post(s).

 

You asked for help with the Chevy bar. I provided it.

 

You asked for help on the trusses. I provided it.

 

You mentioned training and I pointed you to tutorials at CADTutor and a second site. I also provided you with information re: online courses and community college.

 

You inquired about software. We kept you from losing your money to scam artists selling bogus software with the information we provided.

 

You asked for help with Harm's bar. I tried to assist, given the paucity of answers to relevant questions, to the best of my ability.

 

I asked about the toolbars you were using. You did not respond. But I provided you with two images that showed the toolbars I thought would be most useful for you to have open when using AutoCAD 2006.

 

Not until post #63 did the know the circumstances under which you are laboring. I'm sorry you had such bad experiences with architects. There is nothing I can do about that. I applaud the fact you are willing to step out of your trade to pursue AutoCAD 3D.

 

Did you look at any of these tutorials here at CADTutor re: 3D Basics? http://www.cadtutor.net/tutorials/autocad/index.php?category_id=25

 

Bottom line. I tried to help. You don't want my help, specifically, then say so and I will step away from this thread and hold no grudges. I bear you no ill will.

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ReMark

Tell me how to change the view?

 

This can be done in one of two ways.

 

First - manually at the command line using the UCS command.

 

Second - via a button on a toolbar.

 

I recommend having the VIEW toolbar open. Toolbars can be added to your screen simply by right-clicking on an existing toolbar and selecting one of the many options.

 

The toolbar can be placed on your screen wherever you like. It can 'float' or it can be anchored.

 

This is what the VIEW toolbar looks like:

 

ViewToolbar1.PNG

 

I have circled the SE isometric view icon.

 

Next I would recommend that you work in 2Dwireframe visual style rather than in the Conceptual style. Utilize your OSnaps for accurate picks.

 

What else do you want to know about working with the UCS?

 

Do you know how to move the origin of your UCS to a different location on your geometry?

 

Do you know that you can set up multiple viewports in model space and show a different view in each one? This is done via the VIEWPORTS command.

 

ViewportsDialogBox.jpg

 

Here I have elected to have four viewports using a 3D setup showing the top, front, right and SE isometric views. The isometric view I want to see in a conceptual visual style so that's what I set it to display as. The other three views I want to see in a 2Dwireframe visual style.

 

Click in a viewport to make it active. Changes in one viewport will be reflected in the other three.

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ReMark

"You use terms with meanings you only know please dumb it down."

 

Which terms are you referring to? UCS, Viewports, Origin, Visual Style, Toolbars, 3DOrbit, other?

 

Give us a list and we'll explain it and provide an example if required.

Edited by ReMark

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ReMark

"How do you measure sloppy?"

 

Not sure what you are asking here. No one here expects a carpenter with 30 years of experience to be able to pick up 3D AutoCAD overnight. We all had to learn just like you. Some of us have had the benefit of a coworker, a class, or a tutorial to help us on the way while some of us have learned the program entirely on our own.. When I started learning AutoCAD there were no AutoCAD help forums like this, no AutoCAD college courses, and no one outside of a handful of AutoCAD resellers were offering classes (expensive classes). There was but one book and it came with the software. There were no YouTube videos or training DVDs. New users today have a myriad of ways to learn AutoCAD.

 

If we say something you do not understand or use a term you are unfamiliar with do not blindly push on. Stop. Come back and ask us for clarification.

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mikekmx

3D is a steep learning curve.

 

for each drawing, in my experience it's best to have a little think first about how you might achieve the desired result before starting drawing.

 

unless you have a good reason not to, start with either a top or side view and keep the UCS as it is. stick to the main top, bottom and side views.....have ORTHO on and SNAPS on and just tilt the view slightly to make sure you pick up the correct snap point and ensure you are tracking in the right direction. if you do reconfigure the ucs, revert back as quick as you can to a UCS top/side orientation.

 

snaps, ortho lock & a 'standard' UCS orientation are king.

 

sometimes it's better to be in wireframe view, sometimes conceptual.

 

it can sometimes be amazingly easy to go from a 2D drawing to a 3D. sounds backwards, but i usually start with a 2D drawing, make it 3D geometry, then 'FLATSHOT' to make it 2D again!

 

youtube is brilliant for self-learning autocad.

 

i'm sure the experts will disagree with a lot (most?) of the above, but i'm just coming at it from a fellow novice's POV. hope it helps.

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ReMark
I'm still having problems joining lines for extruding. I think it is a ucs issue.

Her is the drawing and where I'm at what I am trying to accomplish is doors and raised panels by extruding on a square path to create them.

 

This view appears to be of the bottom of your bar.

 

I would recommend that you flip the view 180 degrees so you're looking at the bar upright. Then I recommend you "freeze" all layers except those that are absolutely needed. This avoids visual clutter that interferes with proper viewing of the model. A frozen layer is turned off and basically ignored by AutoCAD. Layers can be frozen (then thawed later on when you want to see them) via the Layers toolbar. I've circled the Freeze/Thaw icon on the Layers toolbar below.

 

LayersViewport.PNG

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ReMark

RaisedPanelProfile.PNG

I looked at your raised panel profile and believe I have discovered a problem with both of the arcs circled. If I recall correctly in 2006 you only have the option of extruding a closed profile meaning all of your geometry has to consist of closed polylines to avoid ending up with surfaces. When I attempt to use the Pedit command (Polyline Edit) and its Join option I can't join the arcs to the straight line segments.

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ReMark

ExtrudedProfileBarDoor.jpg

Your reworked profile (after fixing the problem with the two arcs) and a what it looks extruded.

Edited by ReMark

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ReMark

RaisedPanelSection.jpg

Section through my custom raised panel door. Yep, I'm no carpenter!:lol:

I colored the face to make the section profile stand out.

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ReMark

RaisedPanelFullHeight.PNG

The full version of my custom raised panel door.

Tell me everything I got wrong because I don't do stiles, rails or panels for a living. It's OK...I can take it.

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ReMark

SimpleExampleExtrude.jpg

Here is a simple example.

 

Use a normal UCS position with X to the right, Y pointing to the top of the screen and Z coming out at you.

 

Draw the outer edge of half of your door. This will be our path (color: magenta).

 

Draw your profile(s) using a continuous polyline. Do not use separate lines.

 

Copy all of this to the right.

 

Now reorient your UCS at the command line by typing the following:

 

UCS > Enter

X > Enter

90 > Enter

 

What it looks like on screen (at the command line):

 

Command: UCS

 

Current ucs name: *NO NAME*

 

Specify origin of UCS or [Face/NAmed/OBject/Previous/View/World/X/Y/Z/ZAxis] : X

 

Specify rotation angle about X axis : 90

 

Now rotate your profile(s) via the lower right hand corner. Direction will be -90. Do this at the command line.

 

What it looks like on screen (at the command line):

 

Command: RO

ROTATE

Current positive angle in UCS: ANGDIR=counterclockwise ANGBASE=0

 

Select objects: Specify opposite corner: 2 found

 

Select objects:

 

Specify base point:

 

Specify rotation angle or [Copy/Reference] : -90

 

Now extrude the profile(s) using the magenta line as your "path". It does not matter what orientation your UCS is in since the profile will follow the hard path.

 

Were you able to do it?

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D Mills

That is really close just need styles on sides of door. in other words the exterior profile should run in the shape of a square. The interior panel should have the same effect and run in a square. together they will form a door like in your kitchen. styles on a cabinet run vertically rails run horizontally. I was trying to extrude around a square if that can be done. And yes i need a good lesson in controlling the ucs coordinates. When I studied architecture we used pencils and no coerces were made available to us. I have been self taught out of necessity and I am tired of stumbling through this and need to take an really thorough cad course. I wish you guys ran a course you all seem very knowledgeable and helpful.

 

Thanks tremendously for all of your help. When I land this bar job you can exspect a donation defiantly. Right now skating by like everyone else.

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D Mills

Its perfect can this be done on a radius / curve of the bar?

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ReMark

Re: Post #76. I would need an actual door size so I can test the procedure.

 

Re: Post #77. I think so.

Edited by ReMark

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ReMark

HarmsBarDoorPanelFull.jpg

Is this what you had in mind?

Since no width was provided I made this door panel square.

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ReMark

HarmsBarDoorPanelSect.PNG

A vertical section through the door with the faces colored to highlight the fact your original profile was followed.

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