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KharizzaJeh

Floor Plan

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KharizzaJeh

Im trying to draw this floor plan, Actually I don't understand the dimensioning thats why im having a hard time

I also want to know how to draw the walls on the plan

 

Can anyone help me Please?

floorplan.jpg

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ReMark

Those are rough dimensions.

 

Can you post a larger image of the floor plan?

 

Are you drawing this in metric or imperial units?

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KharizzaJeh

Imperial units, heres the Image

floorplan.jpg

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ReMark

Imperial units. OK. Make sure you use the acad.dwt template and set your units to Architectural. The precision can be set to 1/4".

 

Most houses built in the U.S. are done so using 2x4's for the framing although at one time 2x6 framing for the exterior walls was popular.

 

Do you know that a 2x4 actually measures 1 1/2"x3 1/2"? If you use any 1x4's or 1x6's they will be 3/4"x3 1/2" and 3/4"x5 1/2" respectively.

 

Are you familiar with this dimension lumber in terms of what the common sizes used in framing a house are?

 

You should also look at the dimensions for such things as plywood (for roofing and sheathing) and gypsum board (i.e. - sheetrock).

Edited by ReMark

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ReMark

Note that the wall behind the toilet appears to be thicker. That's to allow for a pipe chase. 2x6 construction would be the norm there. Not sure I agree that placing the toilet on that wall is such a good idea.

 

Typical wall section of an American house framed with 2x4's...http://www.co.delaware.oh.us/codecomp/pdf/infopacks/homes/typical%20wall%20section%202.pdf

 

I'd use nothing less than 7/16" (range 5/16" to 3/4") sheathing on the exterior and 1/2" gypsum board on the interior.

 

An example of what a city or town might specify as being an acceptable set of plans for a house....http://www.co.whatcom.wa.us/pds/build/accessory/plans/pdf/BuildingPlansrequirements.pdf

 

I suggest that perhaps for your first house you start off with a single story ranch style (basically it's a rectangle). Do the foundation plan, floor plan, the four elevations and include a typical wall section. I would suggest a simple gable end roof as well. After doing that then you can tackle a multi-story house with stairways and porches/decks, garage, and a more challenging roof.

Edited by ReMark

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f700es

Whew, 36" frost line! Sure is nice in the "South" where we are at 18" ;)

 

Good wall section for reference though and good advise on the real wood sizes of the materials.

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SLW210
Whew, 36" frost line! Sure is nice in the "South" where we are at 18" ;)

 

Good wall section for reference though and good advise on the real wood sizes of the materials.

 

Frost Line! What's a Frost Line? :?

 

South Florida is 0"

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ReMark

Frost line? Does it have something to do with an ice cold beer and the chilled mug it is served in?:lol:

 

Dimensional lumber sizes...http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lumber#Dimensional_lumber

 

Remember: One must always know what size wood they are working with.;)

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ReMark

Habitat for Humanity has six different floor plans at their website (see link below). When you see a number such as "3068" it is reference a door opening in a wall. If I am not mistaken their exterior walls are 2x6 construction.

 

http://www.habitatnashville.org/homeownership/houseplans

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f700es
Habitat for Humanity has six different floor plans at their website (see link below). When you see a number such as "3068" it is reference a door opening in a wall. If I am not mistaken their exterior walls are 2x6 construction.

 

http://www.habitatnashville.org/homeownership/houseplans

 

They usually are 2x6 construction. It just makes for a better house. I have helped work on a few before and I really enjoyed it.

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ReMark

I kind of thought that was the case. I was just too lazy to find and look at the drawing I created for a Habitat house as part of an architectural CAD class I took.

 

I think with advances in high tech foams replacing fiberglass batt insulation builders can stick with 2x4 construction yet get higher R values than they could ever imagine in the past.

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f700es

The last one I worked on, was several years, had a projected monthly energy cost of $60. I wish my power bill was $60!

Standard appliances, insulation and normal heat pump as well. No led or cfl lights either.

 

But yes better R values do lead to using less insulation and normal 2x4 construction.

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ReMark

If the house was that energy efficient it must have been very tightly built. Given that volunteer labor is used that certainly is a credit to Habitat for Humanity leaders and their attention to detail. We have about a dozen of their houses in our city.

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f700es

I would like to see if it made that happen.

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Ski_Me

I think he just wants to draw the floor plan not the whole house. The dimensions you see are from inside to inside. So layout your first wall starting from the most inside and central wall you can find then offset to the inside of the closest exterior wall. Try to work your way out from the inside. Won't be able to be dead on with the plan cause you don't have all the information but you should be close. Remember when you offset for you walls figure 3-1/2" for the stud and 1-1/4" (5/8 x 2 typical for residential) for the drywall in your interior walls. Same thing for the exterior wall but add for the brick (can't remember what the dimension for brick is) and 1/2" between the brick and vapor barrier. It's not hard but you need to pay attention to the details to get it close. You can figure out the windows and doors yourself.

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welldriller

WOW --- Got to get my glasses changed. Looks like feet and inches to me on the drawing.

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ReMark

Yes, it is feet and inches. I could not tell for sure by looking at the first posted image.

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Dana W

That is a real estate sales office floor plan. The dimensions are rounded up a bit and probably only hint at the widest/longest distances in each room. They are merely for the prospective buyer to have a general idea of the room sizes. You could use that plan as a general guide only, to lay out the overall plan.

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KharizzaJeh

how do i make the walls?

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KharizzaJeh

should the drawing units be in inches?

 

and about the walls, how will i make the thick lines,

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