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New AutoCAD Museum Forum


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Yes, it's sad, but for some time now I've thought it would be a good idea to have an AutoCAD nostalgia forum. This is a place where we can collect images of legacy AutoCAD versions.

 

I bet you throw away all your old AutoCAD stuff with each new version. Or maybe there are some hoarders out there who still have the box that their R10 came in. I have to admit that I still have my R12 box - makes a great magazine holder (pictures later). :lol:

 

Anyway, let me know what you think of this idea and take a look at what's there already.

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LOL, I started my CAD life on VersaCAD as well. We had ONE computer in the drafting classroom back in 1988. Also had a 4 pen plotter that would print 11x17. VersaCAD is still alive, WOW! htt

I took a semester of CAD at Palm Beach Jr College in 1982.  It was Cadapple on an Apple II with a 12" × 12" digitizer board.  This was the manuel: https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/CAD-TUTOR-Teaching-Manual-

Your showing your age school 1982.

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tzframpton

well i have to put in my time to get to where you guys are. i started on AutoCAD 98LT that my dad brought home from work, just in case he had to do something at home....

 

but i got my real taste of AutoCAD when i went to college, and got on 2000 & 2002. but i would LOVE to see old scanned boxes/floppy disks, and old screenshots even, and stories. i love history and the evolution of software.... 8)

 

good idea, this forum. i'm sure there will be plenty of people to keep it alive.

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First CAD package I used was DOGS. Drawing office graphics system.

 

Took forever to use as it had no mouse. It was during 1990, at Caledonia University.

 

Nick

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Well, I have only had 3 ACADs, 2000,2004 and 2k7 so I'd also like to see how they were before the ones I know.

 

It's a really good idea, hope it doesn't bring you nightmares :D

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tzframpton

at my last job, there was a computer that still had R12 installed. it was on an old 486 33MHz, or 66MHz, i can't remember. but, my boss made me retreive some old cut patterns off there, and i had to put them all on floppy. lol, maybe i'll give him a call, stop by and get some screenshots. haha

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I still have my copy of LTr12 for students. I bought this WAY back at UNC Charlotte. I paid $50 for it. It is on 4 floppy disks! :shock:

 

I did install it not too long along on my old Win2000 box at the house and it actually ran pretty well.

It was a pain not having Polar Snapping and the improved Object Snaps.

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I post this in the "AutoCAD Museum" forum. Well, maybe it is not really "AutoCAD" related but for sure the next image has no conflicts with the word "Museum"

CNCroll.jpg.f3ff15d271f38460348eb68f6d8e26e7.jpg

I just found this roll in an old drawer. I bet a lot of young people around here have no clue about what is this...

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I had a neighbour who was into electronics, he built a !@#$% reader for us that talked to our NEC PC thats a colour twin 8" disk back in the late 70's we were ahead of our time. Then took the data and loaded into excel.

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I recognise those tapes. I used to use them everyday.

 

I used to run a big metalworking machine that used a set of those to machine 'figure of eight' profiles up to 4 feet across and 10 feet long for 'Sutorbilt' air blower impellers.

Massive machine, the cast iron bed was 12 ft x 8 ft and shuttled 24 feet back and forth under a 10 ft high arch that held the cutting tools.


Then there were 2 cabinets the size of large double wardrobes that held all the mecahnical relay control gear (no microchips, maybe a few transistors) and a seperate operators console with the tape reader.
Pity I can't find a photo, there must be one somewhere.

 

I was using it in 1978, and it was about 15 years old then, a very early CNC machine.
The draughtsmen were still using pencil and paper.

 

I also remember as an apprentice at that company we were tasked with clearing out an attic, in which we found hundreds of engineering drawings from when the firm used to make steam locomotives.
We were told to burn these beautiful drawings, but refused.
I always wondered what happened to them, especially as the firm no longer exists; today while looking for a photo I found out:
 

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In addition to the records preserved with the Bolton Metropolitan Borough Archives, a number of drawings of early locomotive engines have been placed in the care of the Transport Trust, and are housed in the University of Surrey, Guildford.

Good to hear that they were preserved and not burnt.

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